Agile needs to be Business Strategy not IT Strategy

In my last posting I wrote about my frustrations with large projects dressed up to look Agile but without delivering WORKING SOFTWARE, so just compiling risk.

It is very easy to point and throw stones, but what can we actually do about this – and why do we often see Scrum governance at the build phase working within a waterfall implementation phase? Why do we get Water-Scrum-fall?

A place to start would be to observe where this behaviour is most likely to manifest. From my own person experience – and I’d love to get comments from others with differing experience – I see this most frequently in large companies whose main business has IT as an enabler, not as a main product or sales channel. Or basically, IT is not central to business strategy.

So I would suggest to address the issue of failing Agile initiatives / poor adoption of Agile, is to delve deeper into that business strategy, to understand how Agile principles can be incorporated into business leadership.

A common theme at Agile conferences at the moment is corporate culture and examples of Agile principles being applied outside of software engineering, and both of these are tapping away for the same reason, successful Agile adoption requires organisational cultural change and adoption of the principles throughout all departments – not just IT.

I would suggest that the first step would be to express the corporate Target Operating Model in Agile terms – explain how their roadmap can be iteratively achieved considering all elements, people, process and technology. Instead of feature driven end state targets, we should switch to Goal Orientated roadmaps * showing incremental value not a fixation on solutions we can’t be confident in.

* see http://www.romanpichler.com/tools/product-roadmap/ for details

People and Process will need to come before technology in any cultural change. People that value small steps, empowered teams and are customer centric. Processes that enable a safe to fail environment – and don’t mandate stage gate delivery. These will be seismic changes to many organisations – and would require exec level support to take root.

But how is this going to happen:

I would suggest that the Agile movement stops preaching to the choir and starts talking to the real power breakers. Getting project managers, architects and developers together is reinforcing something which is widely supported, but where it is really needed is at the executive level – and there is far too little genuine understanding of the cultural (rather than process) side of Agile behaviours with that group. We should start inviting these people to our arena and tailing our content accordingly. Produce collateral and case studies for IT departments to submit to their senior leadership.

The other route, probably more realistic, would be to focus not on the existing knowledge leaders in the Agile movement, but to those that already have the networks and trust with the necessary audience – the top management consultancies. I am pleased to see that this message is starting to get through as Delotte, McKinseys and the Boston Consulting Group have all set up Digital agency wings, mostly relatively recently, but I can’t help thinking that slightly misses the point – it once again puts Agile Principles in an IT box.

Agile shouldn’t be IT strategy, it needs to be Business Strategy.

Big used to eat small, now, fast eats slow, and Agile is fast. If we can bring the partners of the top consultancies to this line of thinking – then with top down influence we might start seeing some changes.

Comments welcome

#philagiledesign

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