Use Service Design as a tool to challenge

Some would argue that Service Design has been around for ages, for those people that were designing and developing great products years ago, this was what they did, but didn’t take the opportunity to name it, package it and market it. Service Design, as an industry, could be dismissed as the latest reincarnation of common sense – however if it really was so simple and obvious then why weren’t we all doing it, oh how we titter at the common masses for their foolishness, uncomfortable in the knowledge we were just lucky.

Modern Service Design principles and practices are at their most effortless when there is a prevailing wind supporting those activities and their timeline, and there is a very clear vision that focuses on outcomes. Service Design is a structured approach to ensure that users are able to achieve what they need, from their initial desire to the final outcome. Within IT projects it starts with upstream investigations to ensure that what is delivered will fit neatly into the fuller user experience and then manifests more as a user-centric culture from that point on, constantly focusing on the differential between what the user has and what they need. It involves activities such as identifying the users, understanding why they want something, what they are currently doing and how they would naturally approach their need.

My experience with Service Design is less about creating great products but more about identifying and exposing poorly thought through projects. If you follow a service design approach it is very hard to accept a long list of requirements without confidence that they will deliver something appropriately sized in the users’ best interests.

It is more common in a supplier client relationship to feel the need to (and have the opportunity to) challenge the prescribed solution on a table than an in house build. We, the business, have decided we need this widget – please build the widget… This request now usually solicits a slow “Okaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay” from me.

The trap in front of you is to ask the obvious question, “tell me about this widget?”. The right question is, “tell me why this widget will solve your problem?” It could be that the response is a full well researched and documented study on user behaviours and needs, with a few supporting usability studies on prototypes which come neatly packaged with a user researcher to join your team. I say ,“It could be…” but really, that isn’t my experience. Careful questioning usually exposes weak assumptions and through pushing a Service Design strategy you can bring everyone to a common path avoiding too much conflict or loss of face.

Projects that proceed without a good foundation on Service Design (or common sense as it was called before it got a name) typically end in one of three situations:

  • Successful with substantial changes during delivery
  • Successful but over-engineered and expensive – and usually late
  • Abandonment

An immediate focus on the widget proposal on the table will typically take you down these paths, I’ve been there, don’t go there.

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